Glossary

Competence centres (CC)

The competence centres for specialised psycho-educational follow-up (centres de compétences en psycho-pédagogie spécialisée - CC) offer pupils with specific needs specialised services in addition to the services provided by primary or secondary education. The competence centres offer, for example:

  • a specialised diagnosis;
  • advice for professionals dealing with the pupil or people in his/her environment (family, class, etc);
  • specialised ambulatory interventions in regular classes;
  • special schooling in a class at a competence centre.

 

There are eight competence centres and one agency in the Grand Duchy:

 

Inclusion in schools

Les ateliers d’apprentissage sont des ateliers spécifiques qui complètent l’enseignement dispensé dans le cadre de l’offre scolaire régulière. Ils sont organisés par un Centre de compétences, soit dans une de ses annexes décentralisées, soit dans une école ou un lycée ou dans un autre lieu adapté, pendant ou en dehors de l’horaire scolaire régulier. En offrant des ateliers d’apprentissage, les Centres de compétences regroupent des élèves qui ont des besoins similaires. Ils proposent des activités ciblées qui leur permettent de renforcer des compétences spécifiques, p.ex. au niveau de la vue, du langage ou de l’audition, ou du haut potentiel.

Centres de compétences (CC)

The inclusion of children and young people with specific needs is a priority for the Luxembourg Government. It covers a wide range of fields, including:

  • education and training (primary and secondary school, vocational training, higher education, music lessons, adult learning, etcs);
  • education and childcare services (crèches and maisons relais);
  • activities for young people (e.g. at maisons des jeunes - youth centres, holiday and leisure activities).

The various types of assistance offered to pupils with specific needs are primarily intended to allow the children to continue their schooling in regular education, in a class of their peers at primary or secondary school. Pupils with specific needs who attend a class at a competence centre or a school outside the Grand Duchy always stay enrolled in their initial class.



Inclusion commissions

 

The inclusion commissions (commissions d'inclusion - CI) operate in primary education within the fifteen regional directorates. They define the way pupils with specific needs are to be treated at primary schools.  They generally operate on the basis of a request from either the parents, or the class teacher with the parents' agreement. If necessary, they instruct the region's ESEB team to draw up a diagnosis. If appropriate, the CI decide, with the parents' agreement, to forward the pupil's file to the national inclusion commission (CNI) for a diagnosis and specialised care.

 

 

Learning workshops

These learning workshops (ateliers d'apprentissage) are specific workshops in addition to the teaching provided as part of regular schooling. They are organised either at a competence centre or one of its decentralised annexes, or at an primary or secondary school, or at any other appropriate venue, either during or outside normal class hours. By offering these learning workshops, the competence centres bring together pupils with similar needs. They propose targeted activities enabling pupils to reinforce specific skills, e.g. in terms of eyesight, language, hearing, or high potential.

National inclusion commission

The national inclusion commission (Commission nationale d’inclusion - CNI)  intervenes at the national level. Its task is to process requests for a diagnosis or specialised care for a pupil with specific needs.  The CNI generally operates on the basis of a request from either the parents, or an adult pupil, or an approved psycho-social service, or by the pupil's family doctor, or on the basis of a file forwarded by an inclusion commission (CI) or a school inclusion commission (CIS), always with the agreement of the parents or the adult pupil.

In many cases the CNI instructs one or more of the competence centres to draw up a specialised diagnosis. The CNI also monitors the implementation of the measures proposed and accepted by the parents or the adult pupil.

 

Pupil with specific needs

Pupils with specific needs (élève à besoins spécifiques - EBS) find learning harder than most pupils of the same age, or have specific deficiencies or difficulties. They cannot be cared for using the resources normally available to their teachers. They may have the benefit of specialised assistance and support measures, proposed according to their individual needs. A pupil's specific needs may concern motricity, eyesight, language and hearing, cognitive development, or behaviour.

 

Reasonable accommodations

Reasonable accommodations (aménagements raisonnables) are special measures granted to a pupil. Their aim is to adapt teaching and assessment methods to the pupil's needs.  They make it easier for the pupil to assimilate the subjects taught and do better in assessment tests. They may include, for example, rearranging the classroom, presenting questionnaires differently, allowing more time in tests, or the use of technological aids to compensate for the pupil's deficiencies.

Reasonable accommodations commission

The reasonable accommodations commission's (commission des aménagements raisonnables - CAR) task is to decide on reasonable accommodations to be granted to a pupil at a secondary school. The pupil applies to the school's principal. As appropriate, the principal forwards the application to the CAR. Once the CAR has reached a decision, the principal makes sure the decision is implemented.

Individualised support plan, at primary school

The inclusion commissions (CI) set up within the directorates for primary education may draw up individualised support plans (plans de prise en charge individualisé) for each pupil with specific needs. These plans may include a variety of measures such as adapting the teaching in the classroom, assistance being provided in the classroom by specialised outsiders, or having the pupil temporarily attend a different class. The plan is submitted to the parents for their agreement.

Individualised training plan, at secondary school

A secondary school's inclusion commission (commission d'inclusion scolaire - CIS) may propose a individualised training plan (plan de formation individualisé - PFI) The CIS identified the subjects and skills corresponding to the pupil's abilities and adapt the pace of learning to suit the pupil.  The PFI must be accepted by the parents or adult pupil.

Individualised education plan, at a competence centre

Staff at the competence centres draw up an individualised education plan (plan éducatif individualisé - PEI) for each of the pupils with specific needs in their care. These plans are based on the regular syllabuses and curricula of primary and secondary education. They are adapted to the specific educational needs of each pupil in their care.

Support team for pupils with specific needs

The support team for pupils with specific needs (équipe de soutien des élèves à besoins spécifiques - ESEB) operate either within the regional directorates for primary education, or at secondary schools. They advise the teachers on dealing with pupils with specific needs, and may themselves provide ambulatory support at the school in the form of assistance in the classroom. They may draw up an initial diagnosis, in collaboration with the teachers concerned, and make sure pupils receive the assistance decided on by the relevant inclusion commission (CI) or school inclusion commission (CIS).

School inclusion commissions

The school inclusion commissions (commissions d'inclusion scolaire - CIS) operate in secondary education. They define the way pupils with specific needs are to be treated at secondary schools.  The CIS generally operate on the basis of a request from either the parents, or an adult pupil, or the head teacher (régent de classe) or school principal with the parents' or adult pupil's agreement. If necessary, they instruct the school's ESEB team to draw up a comprehensive diagnosis. If appropriate, they decide, with the parents' or adult pupil's agreement, to forward the pupil's file to the national inclusion commission (CNI) for a diagnosis and specialised care.

 

 

 

Specialised ambulatory intervention

Specialised ambulatory intervention (intervention spécialisée ambulatoire - ISA) involve specialised services provided by the competence centres for pupils with specific needs. It takes place in the classroom at an primary or secondary school, in addition to the measures set up in the (secondary) school. Specialists from the competence centres work in close collaboration with the (secondary) school's staff.

Specialised care

Specialised care covers all the intervention provided by a competence centre for a pupil with specific needs. Specialised care may be organised:

  • exclusively in an primary or secondary school or at a competence centre, or
  • simultaneously and complementarily in an primary or secondary school and at a competence centre.

It may take the form of specialised ambulatory intervention (ISA), special schooling, or a learning workshop.

Specialised diagnosis

A specialised diagnosis makes it possible to identify exactly the pupil's specific needs and decide which assistance and support measures match these needs. Specialised diagnoses are carried out under the responsibility of the competence centres for specialised psycho-educational follow-up (CC).

Special schooling

Special schooling refers to the specialised care of a pupil with specific needs in a class at a competence centre, or simultaneously and complementarily in a class at an primary or secondary school and in a class at a competence centre.

 

Specialized teachers for pupils with specific needs (I-EBS)

Specialized teachers for pupils with specific needs (I-EBS) (instituteurs spécialisés dans la prise en charge des élèves à besoins spécifiques - I-EBS) are directly allocated to primary schools. This means they are one of the primary contacts for the pupils with specific needs, their parents, the class teachers and the educational teams. They may assist the pupils in the classroom, and work closely with the members of the ESEB teams and the inclusion commissions.

 

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